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Archive for the ‘Photographers’ Category

Heidi Specker

I find the work of German photographer Heidi Specker truly fascinating. It is the captivating contrasts of mundane objects in her compositions, objects creating patterns that would be usually ignored but become alive with her pictures. More images here, and don’t miss her books.

I am interested in the contrast between recorded reality and the effect of the image that I create. – Heidi Specker

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This is why we start, this is why we keep doing it …, isn’t it?

In the moments when inspiration does not find our path, or when the jobs are scarce or the client complains too much … remember, it is all about the fun. Enjoy the moments when photography flows from inside …

More about Jacques-Henri Lartigue after the jump. Some pictures here, here, here and here.

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[Limited series prints for sale at at the Humble Arts Foundation]

I am very pleased to post an in-depth interview with photographer Jennifer Loeber. Jennifer Loeber is a young photographer based in New York City. Jennifer’s portfolio reflects the exploration of an evolving artistic vision, from documentary series to portraits that have the quality to bridge both the subject and the viewer with a unique sense of intimacy. Her work was exhibited at a group show by the Humble Arts Foundation in New York City. Her latest series, Zeig Mal (Show Me), was featured in a profile on Gothamist.com and her first feature documentary, Fishkill Flea, is currently exhibiting internationally. Jennifer has also a personal blog.

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© Thomas Misik

Thomas Misik is a German photographer that photographs spaces where geometry, color and composition create an illusion of unpopulated areas isolated from their own context. His work shows the space as an art form, sterile, without human presence. Unfortunately, it is not easy to find much of his work online but found some interesting images via galerie-poller. The navigation is not very intuitive: click on the images until you see thumbnails on the right side, with galleries for different years. Click on the thumbnails to see larger images.

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”Guy was the closest thing to a fine-art photographer that this business has produced.” – Albert Watson

I find very interesting the intersection between fashion and fine art photography, and both Guy Bourdin and Albert Watson, merge those genres like few have done. At the core of Guy Bourdin’s photographs there is a challenge to the very nature of commercial image making. Typical fashion images focus on beauty and clothing as their central elements. Guy Bourdin, on the contrary, presented fashion as an excuse to make beautiful photographs rather than the subject of his photographs. His main impact in photography resides on the fact that it is not fashion itself but the image that fascinates the viewer.

Guy Bourding was a radical artist in his field, he lived outside the cutting edge and so he re-defined it. He is one of the few in fashion whose work will endure the passage of time, placing him in the pedestal of the most influent photographers of the second half of the 20th century. You can see more of his images here, and after the jump, and a reference from the New York Times.

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Johanna Warwick is another extraordinary photographer I discovered via the project Flash Forward [also at Flak Photo], organized by the Magenta Foundation in Canada. She has really excellent photography at her website, but the series that really got my attention is “The Weight of the World“.

This is a series that comprises 12 images of ceilings that act as a canvas replicating the perception of looking at the ceiling. The images, like broken prices of the whole view, are intermixed and create both a sense of unity and a feel of fragmentation. The combination of the images both replicates the experience of looking up while laying on the bed and create a sense of confusion that rather than being bothersome turns out to be quite pleasurable, like waking up from a dream. I think this work by Johanna Warwick is both extraordinary creative and very beautiful.

A very interesting interview with the artist was published at Function Magazine.

“I think it’s a very internal body of work. The pictures are portraying that internal space that we all have and I think for me they come from this time in our early 20s, where you’re trying to figure out what you’re doing and where your going and that sense of being lost, for me that’s where it came from, but I think it is something that applies to anyone in any time of life. We are always going to know that place. We are always going to know that feeling and that sense of being lost. To me that’s where it came from.”- Johanna Warwick

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Denis Darzacq

As a part of his remarkable series of people “suspended in the air” [ see Sans titre and Hyper], Denis Darzacq has a very impressive set of images named “La Chute” (The Fall), where he uses street dancers to create the perception of people falling on to the streets. I have seen the prints and they are quite extraordinary. If you are located in the Los Angeles area, you have the opportunity to see the images in the new exhibit at de Soto Gallery..

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